Getting Serious About Pornography (National Review article)

Hard Core: Defeating Sexual Temptation with a Superior Satisfaction (by Jason Hardin)My thanks to the readers who’ve sent links to the article below that was recently printed in the National Review.   It was written by an anonymous female psychologist who lives with her five children in Virginia.

I’ve recently spoken out in a new book about the challenge of defeating sexual temptation from a Biblical point-of-view, and I continue to be encouraged by the positive and constructive feedback.   In recent weeks, I’ve especially been encouraged to hear that several summer camps are planning to use the material in appropriate forums.   While obviously a difficult and sensitive subject to address, it is not a subject we can afford to ignore.   Perhaps something in the book would be helpful to you or someone you know who is presently struggling with this very real temptation.

Here’s an excerpt of the National Review article:

Imagine a drug so powerful it can destroy a family simply by distorting a man’s perception of his wife.   Picture an addiction so lethal it has the potential to render an entire generation incapable of forming lasting marriages and so widespread that it produces more annual revenue—$97 billion worldwide in 2006—than all of the leading technology companies combined.   Consider a narcotic so insidious that it evades serious scientific study and legislative action for decades, thriving instead under the ever-expanding banner of the First Amendment.

According to an online statistics firm, an estimated 40 million people use this drug on a regular basis.   It doesn’t come in pill form.   It can’t be smoked, injected, or snorted.   And yet neurological data suggest its effects on the brain are strikingly similar to those of synthetic drugs.   Indeed, two authorities on the neurochemistry of addiction, Harvey Milkman and Stanley Sunderwirth, claim it is the ability of this drug to influence all three pleasure systems in the brain—arousal, satiation, and fantasy—that makes it “the pièce de résistance among the addictions.”

[Read the full article…]